Lindsay Artkop

Lindsay Artkop

July, 2016

 

Lindsay Artkop graduated from Berklee College of Music in May 2016 with a B.A in Professional Music. While at Berklee, she concentrated on Drum Set Performance and Music Business. Her education also strengthened her skills in Music Theory, Harmony, Ear Training and Songwriting. Some teachers she studied with at Berklee include Bob Gullotti, Dave Dicenso, Ralph Peterson, Kim Plainfield, Henrique De Almeida, Tony Thunder Smith, Jon Hazilla, and Terri Lyne Carrington.

In May 2015, Lindsay won 1st place in Hit Like a Girl, an international competition for female drummers. Judges included Kim Thompson (Beyoncé, Late Night with Seth Meyers), Venzella Joy (Beynoncé), Didi Negron (Cirque De Soleil), Hannah Welton (Prince) and more.  Lindsay has performed, traveled, and gigged with countless artists and ensembles for over 10 years. She has experience with playing at filled arenas as well as intimate venues where she can reorchestrate parts to fit cocktail kit or cajon/percussion.

Lindsay presents drum clinics at conventions, institutions and universities. Most recently she was featured in the 2015 Percussive Art Society's International Convention, New York University's 2016 Annual Day of Percussion, and a solo clinic The Collective in NYC.  She also teaches Skype Drum Lessons, and is currently building her own Online Drum Education Resource, set to launch in September 2016. She's been scheduled for performances, interviews, lesson teaching and drum collaborations on DrumChannel, was featured in magazines such as DRUM! and TomTom, and has created video collaborations with famous drummers such as Kiran Gandhi and Shariq Tucker. Lindsay also composes, records, and produces original music, and much more.

 

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Check out the below interview with Lindsay!


Where did you grow up and how did you start playing the drums?

I grew up in Durham, Connecticut.  At our school district, students had the option of joining the school band when they entered the fourth grade. Once my older sister came of age, she wanted to play the clarinet, so our dad took us to a local shop to rent her instrument for school. Upon entering, I noticed a shiny drum set on display. I kept tapping at it with my hands and my dad saw my interest. I was lucky enough to come home that day with a snare drum and bright red sticks! We came home and my mom set up private lessons with the band teacher in our town, Cheryl Weiner. I learned the basics of percussion with Ms. Weiner, like rudiments, stick control, snare drum reading, and other mallet and percussion work. I went on to study with a lot of other local drum teachers in Connecticut, including CT Valley School of Music & Dance, Minnotti Music, Hartt School of Music and others. All throughout middle and high school I participated in all the bands and music clubs such as Jazz Band, Dixieland Band, Marching Band, Concert Band and more. Once I got to high school, I became more serious about music, particularly jazz. I then started studying with Jesse Hameen II in New Haven, CT at Neighborhood Music School. Jesse opened my eyes to Latin and Afro-Cuban drumming, teaching me authentic african rhythms and clave. He also helped me develop my jazz chops. When he learned I was a serious student, he suggested I audition at Educational Center for The Arts (ECA), a magnet school for the performing arts, in New Haven, CT. I enrolled at ECA and studied Jazz Performance and Jazz Composition with Jeff Fuller, Jim Martin, Wayne Escoffery and others. I also studied with Bernard Purdie during that time. Throughout high school I performed and recorded with artists and bands throughout the New England area, especially with my own Funk group, “Lindsay Artkop and Friends.”

After high school I enrolled at Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. I just graduated from Berklee in May 2016 with a B.A in Professional Music. While at Berklee, I concentrated on Drum Set Performance and Music Business. My education also strengthened my skills in Music Theory, Harmony, Ear Training and Songwriting. Some teachers I studied with at Berklee include Bob Gullotti, Dave Dicenso, Ralph Peterson, Kim Plainfield, Henrique De Almeida, Tony Thunder Smith, Jon Hazilla, and Terri Lyne Carrington.

In May 2015, I won 1st place in Hit Like a Girl, an international competition for female drummers. Judges included Kim Thompson (Beyoncé, Late Night with Seth Meyers), Venzella Joy (Beynoncé), Didi Negron (Cirque De Soleil), Hannah Welton (Prince) and more. I've performed, traveled, and gigged with artists and ensembles for over 10 years. I present drum clinics at conventions, institutions and universities. Most recently I was featured in the 2015 Percussive Art Society's International Convention, New York University's 2016 Annual Day of Percussion, and will be presenting a solo clinic The Collective in NYC this September.  I also have been having a blast teaching Skype Drum Lessons to students around the world. I'm currently building my own Online Drum Education Website, "Lindsay's Lessons" set to launch in September 2016. I've been scheduled for performances, interviews, lesson teaching and drum collaborations on DrumChannel, was featured in magazines such as DRUM! and TomTom, and have created video collaborations with famous drummers such as Kiran Gandhi and Shariq Tucker. I also compose, record, and produce original music, and much more.

How was your experience at Berklee College of Music and what tips do you have for drummers interested in going?

My experience at Berklee was absolutely incredible. One of the biggest divides in my life is "Before Berklee", and "After Berklee". My first semester felt like I entered a whole new world, which was both amazing and scary at the same time. Those first few months were very exciting, and every day I was exposed to new experiences. Within just the first week, I made new relationships with people from around the world that would soon turn into lifelong friendships. Residing in the Berklee dorms, I was truly living and breathing music 24/7. At any given time, I was usually in a class, practicing, doing music-related homework, jamming, in a rehearsal, in a recording session or listening to music. While at Berklee, I concentrated on Drum Set Performance and Music Business. My education also strengthened my skills in Music Theory, Harmony, Ear Training and Songwriting. I'd never worked so hard in my life, it truly shaped me into who I am today as a musician and person.

Advice:

Berklee can only be beneficial to a student with a lot of self-advocacy. Berklee is the epitome of "getting back what you put in". For the people that don't want to put in the work, or deny that this is even true, Berklee can be a very unsatisfying experience. It will feel like everyone else is getting ahead while you're in the same place and don't know why. The people that work really hard, foster relationships, go above and beyond what is required, never get distracted and keep pushing after rejections and failed attempts will get back what they put in, one-thousand fold. Before I went to Berklee, I read this blog post by Derek Sivers, a Berklee Alumni that went on to create CDBaby. If you're thinking of going or already there, read this. You'll be very glad you did! https://sivers.org/berklee

What advice do you have to any upcoming drummer?

  • You can achieve anything you put your mind to. Don't let people convince you otherwise.
  • Find great teachers and mentors you really connect with.
  • Go see live performances and clinics! It's one thing to watch your favorite drummers on YouTube, but it's completely different to experience their playing live and absorb their thoughts if they offer them. Seeing my favorite drummers live shapes my musicianship and inspires me to grow.
  • Focus on studying the greats. Modern drummers can be incredible, but they all got to where they are by studying masters such as Tony Williams, Dennis Chambers and Elvin Jones, for example. Going straight to the source will help you grow faster and more efficiently.
  • Listen as much as possible to music.
  • Transcribe as much as possible.
  • The drumming community is the best instrumental family there is. It's filled with genuine people that enjoy helping others on their journey. Join it and contribute!
  • Practicing every day for 20 minutes is better than practicing a few hours a week in one day.
  • Above all else, "You can only regret what you don't do".